Our Philosophy

We meet you where you are... We see you and we hear you!

 

We believe in voluntad. Voluntad means the ability to choose the direction of your own life, with freedom and dignity. In order to help you make the changes you want to make, and find the safety you need, we provide the support and resources you need. We are the resource experts, but YOU are the expert of you.

 

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Our Services

The Street’s Hope Program provides four different categories of services, all specifically designed to support people who have experienced or are currently experiencing exploitation through human trafficking (forced labor or commercial sex) and the concomitant precarious housing, homelessness, unemployment, mental health and substance abuse issues and criminal justice system involvement which accompanies such exploitation.

Crisis Intervention

Street Outreach

On-Site & Community Programs

Education & Awareness

Our Philosophy

Our aim is to provide the necessary support and resources to each individual that supports growth out of crisis, through at-risk, stable, growing and ultimately to thriving. These domains are based, in part, on the National Wellness Model and SAMSHA criteria.

We meet you where you are at and provide survivor-informed, evidence-based services to people experiencing exploitation associated with human trafficking. We envision a world where all people are free from exploitation.

Street’s Hope was established in 2004 and has continuously operated since that time. Services include weekly street outreach, crisis counseling and weekly psycho- educational groups for off-site community partners who serve our population, as well as on-site intensive case management, including mental health services. Street’s Hope also provides training and consultation to other organizations working with survivors of exploitation.

 

Street’s Hope acknowledges the complicated web of human and social factors that affect our population and actively work to help each person we work with identify, create and maintain individualized trajectories to a meaningful life after their exploitative experience and participation in our program.

What You Need to Know...

"Street's Hope acknowledges the complicated web of human and social factors that affect our population and actively work to help each person we work with identify, create and maintain individualized trajectories to a meaningful life after their exploitative experience and participation in our program."

James Davis, Age 32

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Beth Cordell, Age 18

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Tom Drake, Age 87

Frequently Asked Questions

How much do traffickers make every year?

Recent estimates show that HT is a $150 billion per year industry, worldwide.

Aren't most victims smuggled over the border?

No, trafficking is NOT the same as smuggling. Many trafficking victims from other countries come to the US with a visa and are then trafficked here. Many other US citizens are trafficked right here in the US. The US is a source of trafficking victims, not just a destination for trafficking.

But, Colorado doesn't have much of a trafficking problem, right?

At a single point in time in 2013, Colorado identified Human Traffic victims from 41 countries .

Aren't most trafficking victims children?

No. The media sensationalizes and reports on the trafficking of children, but 75% of HT victims are adults.

Aren't traffickers strangers who kidnap their victims?

No, 90% of traffickers are known to their victims.

Are most trafficking victims rescued?

Less than 1% of estimated victims are actually identified as such each year.

Isn't most trafficking sex trafficking?

Most of the money traffickers make is made through trafficking people in the commercial sex industry – about $99/$150 billion. However, men make up 45% of trafficking victims, and they are mostly trafficked into various other industries as a source of cheap labor.

Why don't people just run away from their traffickers?

There are many reasons, all having to do with the vulnerabilities that expose people to traffickers in the first place.  Fear of physical retribution, loss of identification documents, threats to family, and not knowing their location are just some of the methods of control employed by traffickers. .

Our Blog

Stay in touch with us and keep up to date on our progress and current anti-trafficking actions across the nation.

In This Season of Gratitude

In This Season of Gratitude

Written by Becky Plunkett What brings you together at the holidays? What connects you to your loved ones, to strangers, to your community? For my family, the answer is simple: food. Food not only sustains us; it is a common point of connection. It brings the humanness...

Get in Touch

For information about our program and services and/or resources and referrals, please call: 303-433-2712.

For administrative needs such as donations, event or development needs, volunteer information, please call 720-420-9951.

info@streetshope.org

 

Open Hours

Monday- 11:00am-5:00pm

Tuesday- 9:00am-5:00pm

Wednesday- 9:00am-5:00pm

Thursday- 9:00am-12:00pm

Friday- 9:00am-5:00pm     

Closed on Major Holidays